RESEARCH: ILLINOIS WNV MOSQUITO INFECTION RATE MODEL

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Historical Maps by County - Historical Maps by Climate Division - All Maps by Year

HISTORICAL MAPS BY CLIMATE DIVISION

WNV Human Cases

2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007
2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013
WNV Human Cases

WNV Human Incidence

2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007
2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013
WNV Human Incidence

Mosquito Infection Rate

                     2004   2005   2006   2007
2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013
IL Mosquito Infection Rate


Temperature Difference from 30-yr Average

2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007
2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013
IL Temperature Difference from 30-Yr Average

Precipitation Difference from 30-yr Average

2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007
2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013
IL Temperature Difference from 30-Yr Average

These maps show data of the number of reported cases of human illness from WNV, the rate of illness per population in each Climate Division (incidence) and the mosquito infection rate for each year for which data were reported to the Illinois Department of Public Health.  Climate Divisions have been used by climatologists for many years to summarize weather conditions.  These Divisions are larger areas than counties (see the Historical Maps by County described above), and are thus more suitable for illustrating general trends in temperature and precipitation across Illinois.  Temperature, for example, while varying noticeably from north to south, is relatively consistent otherwise so that the average temperature in counties that are near eath other are usually quite similar.   Precipitation events also are spatially coherent, because events associated with fronts and other organized weather systems can cover large areas and move across long distances.  Further, not all counties have the resources to test mosquitos for West Nile Virus, but information from adjoining counties who do test is still relevant to the region.   Again, the interpretation of the incidence rate is important, because the number of human cases is naturally related to the number of people who live in the Climate Division.  With the incidence rate, the number of human cases has been normalized by population to provide a more sensitive indicator of the human threat.

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